Report , 

North Carolina School Justice Partnership Research Project

The study evaluated the impact of School Justice Partnerships on school-based offenses in seven counties where SJPs had been established.

Files

Summary

This study analyzed school discipline data for seven counties where School Justice Partnerships had been established for at least two years prior to July 1, 2020, which included: Brunswick, Greene, Lenoir, Mecklenburg, New Hanover, Stanly, and Wayne Counties.

It evaluated the impact of School Justice Partnerships on school-based offenses in the seven counties using data from the following sources: calendar year data from the Juvenile Justice Section of the North Carolina Department of Public Safety; school discipline data from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction; and Race Equity Cards developed by the Southern Coalition for Social Justice.

Overall, five of the seven counties experienced a decrease in the number of school-based offenses from the year prior to the implementation of the School Justice Partnership to 2020, while two counties experienced a slight increase in school-based offenses in 2020.

The study also showed that, on average, black students are more likely than their peers to be referred to juvenile delinquency court based on 2019 calendar year data. These results are consistent with statewide data, which shows that black students are disproportionately represented in North Carolina’s juvenile justice system.