All Things Judicial Podcast

A bi-monthly podcast about the important role of the North Carolina Judicial Branch in state government.

About

All Things Judicial Podcast Logo

All Things Judicial is a podcast about the important role of the North Carolina Judicial Branch in state government. The podcast follows a bi-monthly release schedule with each new episode available for download every other Wednesday beginning February 10, 2021.

On this podcast you’ll hear interviews from recognizable figures in our judicial communities and learn about topics you may not have realized were related to what we do every day – human trafficking prevention, civics education, and the increased modernization of our courts. We think we’ve found a podcast format that really works with rotating guest hosts that will keep each episode fresh and interesting to our listeners.

All Things Judicial is available on all podcast platforms or below on NCcourts.gov.

Episodes

Episode 51 – This episode is the second episode in a two-part series in recognition and appreciation of Veterans Day and the United States Armed Forces. Both episodes are hosted by attorney and North Carolina Army National Guard Captain Tom Murry. In this second episode, Murry is joined by Lieutenant Colonel Mike McCann, Staff Judge Advocate for the North Carolina National Guard, and Lieutenant Colonel David Thorneloe, Deputy Staff Judge Advocate for the North Carolina National Guard. They discussed their backgrounds and roles as judge advocates in the North Carolina National Guard, and how the National Guard worked to serve North Carolinians during recent state active duty missions which included natural disasters and civil disturbances. 

"It is inspiring to see young men and women willing to take on these missions, some popular and some unpopular, but all needed to be done ... never hesitating. It's inspiring to see," said Lieutenant Colonel McCann on the podcast.

In the episode released today, listeners hear from senior level judge advocate officers in the North Carolina Army National Guard (NCARNG). They have a wide array of experience advising commanders during foreign and domestic military missions and are responsible for managing the judge advocates serving in the NCARNG.

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Episode 50 – This is the first episode in a two-part series in recognition and appreciation of Veterans Day and the United States Armed Forces. Both episodes are hosted by attorney and North Carolina Army National Guard Captain Tom Murry. In the first episode, Murry is joined by two attorneys with the North Carolina Army National Guard, Captain Katie Reynolds, and Lieutenant J.T. Kinane. They discussed the North Carolina National Guard legal assistance program, Service Members Civil Relief Act, and the North Carolina Service Members Civil Relief Act. 

"While I was deployed, I assisted several soldiers with their immigration process where they actually became U.S. citizens during a deployment and were naturalized at a U.S. embassy by the ambassador," said Murry on the podcast. "That's a pretty awesome experience as an attorney to see these soldiers who have signed-up to serve this country and then become citizens of this country because of that service."

In the episode released today, listeners will hear an enlightening discussion about legal services available to military personnel that judges, prosecutors, and court staff may find useful if they encounter service members in court. In the second part of this series to be released in two weeks, Murry will be joined by senior level judge advocate officers in the North Carolina Army National Guard (NCANG). They have a wide array of experience advising commanders during foreign and domestic military missions and are responsible for managing the judge advocates serving the NCARNG. 

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Episode 49 – Each Halloween season, All Things Judicial releases a special episode called "Fright Court," where the focus turns to ghostly legends associated with North Carolina's courthouses. The second oldest courthouse in the state, built in 1786, is located in Beaufort County, in the City of Washington. Allegedly, this courthouse is haunted by the ghost of a defendant named Reverend George Washington Carawan, who was tried for murder in 1853. We interviewed Terry Rollins, Youth Services Librarian at the Brown Library in Washington, to get the full story about this remarkable case. 

"(After the trial) people started reporting something very strange occurring in this building," said Rollins on the podcast. "Those stories have persisted decade after decade, and year after year, since 1853."

The second segment of the podcast involves former Supreme Court of North Carolina Associate Justice George Brown, and his wife Laura Ellison Brown. The justice and his wife were local benefactors in the City of Washington, who after their deaths, bequeathed their estate to establish a public library. The Brown Library found a permanent place on the justice’s old homesite, but some report that the Browns continue to visit the library almost 100 years after their deaths. 

The reports of hauntings in North Carolina's courthouses are unverified. However, witness claim that they are true. Are some of North Carolina's courthouses haunted? Listen to the podcast and you be the judge.

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Episode 48 – Each year, the North Carolina Judicial Branch recognizes Conflict Resolution Day which falls on October 20, 2022. In this episode, we honor this special day with two segments featuring the North Carolina Dispute Resolution Commission. In the first segment, the Commission’s Executive Director Tara Kozlowski interviews the Commission’s Vice-Chairman, North Carolina Court of Appeals Judge John Tyson, about the structure and role of the Commission. In the second segment, Administrative Assistant Maureen Robinson joins Kozlowski to share a few of the more memorable stories, and lessons learned, from mediations over their careers in North Carolina’s courts. 

"If we just look at the number of court cases that are filed every year, over two million, if you had to try every case you would never get to all of them," said Tyson on the podcast. "If there is another mechanism where parties can come to an agreement voluntarily and take the case out of the court system, that is good."

The North Carolina Dispute Resolution Commission was established in October 1995 and is charged primarily with certifying and regulating private mediators who serve North Carolina courts. To find out more about the Commission, visit NCcourts.gov.

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Episode 47 – This episode of All Things Judicial  features a 2015 interview with former Superior Court Judge Shirley L. Fulton. Judge Fulton made history for being the first African American woman to serve as a prosecutor in Mecklenburg County, and the first African American woman to serve as a North Carolina superior court judge. Her distinguished service on the Mecklenburg County bench lasted for over 20 years. The interview was conducted by Dr. Mary Howerton, professor at Queens University of Charlotte. 

"As lawyers, we are the single most important route to equality and equity," said Fulton on the podcast. "I am so proud to be a lawyer and serve this state to make the justice system the best that it can be and to keep our profession a high calling in the spirit of public service."

This interview is part of the Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism's historical video series. A video of this interview can be viewed on the Judicial Branch YouTube Channel

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Episode 46 – Each year, the North Carolina Judicial Branch recognizes September 17 as Constitution Day. In this episode of All Things Judicial, the Branch honors this special day by listening to excerpts from a lecture by two authors who wrote the book on the North Carolina Constitution, Chief Justice Paul Newby and University of North Carolina Professor John Orth. Published in 2013, Newby and Orth co-authored the book entitled, "The North Carolina State Constitution," which provides an outstanding constitutional and historical account of the state's governing charter.

"Both of these documents (United States Constitution and North Carolina State Constitution) begin with 'we the people,'" said Newby on the podcast. "These are our documents and fortunately the 1868 Constitution which has given so much power to 'we the people' has endured and it is our job to safeguard it."

This lecture was originally recorded in the Senate chamber of the North Carolina State Capitol in 2018 as part of a reenactment of the 1868 Constitutional Convention. A video reenactment can be found on the NCcourts Facebook page.

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Episode 45 –  This episode of All Things Judicial  features an interview with former Campbell University President Norman Adrian Wiggins. Dr. Wiggins earned his law degree from Wake Forest College School of Law, and a Masters of Law and Doctor in the Science of Law from Columbia Law School. From 1967 until 2003, Dr. Wiggins served as President of Campbell University. In 1976, Wiggins founded the law school at Campbell University named in his honor, the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law. Dr. Wiggins was interviewed by Mel Wright, the Executive Director of the Chief Justice’s Commission on Professionalism (CJCP).

"Academic excellence is mandatory throughout all of education, but if we don't take care of the professionalism responsibilities we will not be good lawyers and the profession will not be in good shape," said Wiggins on the podcast. 

This interview is part of the Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism's historical video series. A video of this interview can be viewed on the Judicial Branch YouTube Channel.

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Episode 44 – This episode of All Things Judicial focuses on North Carolina's School Justice Partnerships (SPJs), which are programs designed to keep kids in school and out of court. In the first segment of the podcast, we hear testimonials from judges, school superintendents, a county sheriff, and a district attorney who have partnered to form an SJP in their respective counties. Next, DeShield Greene, court management specialist in the Programs Division of the Administrative Office of the Courts, shares the broad perspective and scope of SJP implementation across North Carolina.

"There are about 51 counties that have school justice partnerships in place ... that's very impressive as they've really picked-up in the last two-to-three years," said Greene on the podcast. "The future is pretty bright for school justice partnerships."

An SJP is groups of community stakeholders which typically include school administrators, law enforcement, judges, court system and juvenile justice personnel, and others that develop and implement effective strategies to address student misconduct. SJPs work to reduce the number of suspensions, expulsions, and referrals to the justice system by timely and constructively addressing student misconduct when and where it happens, helping students succeed in school and preventing negative outcomes for both youth and their communities.

You can learn more about SJPs and their track record of success by viewing the SJP Fact Sheet on NCcourts.gov.  

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Episode 43 – The latest episode of the All Things Judicial podcast features an interview with former Supreme Court of North Carolina Chief Justice James G. Exum, Jr. Exum earned his law degree from New York University School of Law, served as a superior court judge from 1967–1974, served as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina from 1975–1986, and served as the chief justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina from 1986–1995.

In this 2006 interview conducted by former superior court judge and former director of the North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC) Tom Ross, Exum reflects on his early life in Eastern North Carolina, career in the state judicial system, and the importance of the judiciary in maintaining a functioning democracy.    

"The legal profession and our judicial system are the only place where serious disputes can be resolved according to rationality and mutual principles of law," said Exum on the podcast. "As lawyers, we are all part of the same profession and we have a duty to treat each other as professionals … and we can disagree without being disagreeable."

This interview is part of the Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism's historical video series. A video of this interview can be viewed on the Judicial Branch YouTube Channel.

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Episode 42 – The latest episode of the All Things Judicial podcast focuses on the Chief Justice's Taskforce on ACEs-Informed Courts and the strategic partnership with Proverbs 226, a faith-based non-profit focused on reconciling incarcerated fathers with their families. Guests on this episode are District Attorney Ben David who serves New Hanover and Pender counties, and Cyril Prayboo, president and founder of Proverbs 226.

"Having fathers involved in the lives of their kids is a great thing," said David on the podcast. "If they are incarcerated, we need to keep that bond between children and their fathers ... that's good for the kids, it's good for the dads, and it's good for society at large when we talk about reducing the rates of recidivism."

The term "ACEs" refers to "adverse childhood experiences" and "adverse community environments." The Task Force's mission is to understand the impact of ACEs on children and develop strategies for addressing adverse childhood experiences within our court system.

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Episode 41 – The latest episode of the All Things Judicial podcast features an interview with former United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit Judge Allyson Duncan. Duncan earned her law degree from Duke University School of Law, worked as as associate professor at North Carolina Central University School of Law, and served as a judge on the North Carolina Court of Appeals before being appointed to the federal bench.

In this 2018 interview conducted by former North Carolina Bar Association President Catharine Arrowood, Duncan reflects on her family, legal service, and professionalism in the North Carolina legal system.   

"Professionalism means aspiring to the highest aspirations of the profession," said Duncan on the podcast. "To work as hard as we can for the good of our clients. To attempt to elevate the standards of our profession and to treat everyone with whom we come into contact with dignity and respect."

This interview is part of the Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism's historical video series. A video of this interview can be viewed on the Judicial Branch YouTube Channel.

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Episode 40 – This episode of the All Things Judicial focuses on North Carolina's magistrates with guests Magistrate Christopher Bazzle (Mecklenburg), Magistrate Jacqueline Foster (Guilford), and Magistrate Katrina Watson (Mecklenburg). They discuss the role of magistrates in the Judicial Branch and highlight the specific duties magistrates perform in their counties. 

"I believe that the magistrate's role is vital to people's access to justice," said Bazzle on the podcast. "The ability to see and hear everyone in our community for the individuals that they are and give them their chance to be heard, both in criminal and civil court without the necessity of hiring an attorney, gives them a way to resolve issues in a more peaceful manner and that is very important in maintaining a just and balanced society for everybody."

Magistrates are judicial officers, recognized by the North Carolina constitution to perform numerous duties in both civil and criminal proceedings. They are often a person's first contact with the Judicial Branch and make decisions in criminal proceedings that include conducting initial appearances, setting conditions of release, and issuing warrants. Magistrates' civil proceedings include hearing small claims cases, entering orders for summary ejectment (evictions), and determining involuntary commitments. Magistrates are the only civil officials in the state who can perform marriages. 

To learn more about North Carolina magistrates, please visit the Court Officials page on NCcourts.gov.

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Episode 39 – This episode of the All Things Judicial podcast features an interview with former Chief Justice Burley Mitchell. Mitchell worked in several county and state government leadership positions before serving as a judge on the North Carolina Court of Appeals, as associate justice of the the Supreme Court of North Carolina, and the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. During his tenure as Chief Justice, Mitchell created the Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism (CJCP) with the mission to enhance professionalism among North Carolina lawyers.

In this 2015 interview conducted by former North Carolina Court of Appeals Chief Judge Gerald Arnold, Mitchell reflects on professionalism, service, and civility in the North Carolina legal profession.   

"I believe it is harder today for lawyers to be thoroughgoing professionals, to put that service aspect first, where it should be, because there are so many competing pressures and demands," said Mitchell on the podcast. "But we've got to get back to that if we are going to continue to be a profession."

This interview is part of CJCP's historical video series. A video of this interview can be viewed on the Judicial Branch YouTube Channel.

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Episode 38 – This episode of the All Things Judicial podcast honors National Drug Court Month by traveling to Kinston, North Carolina for the 8th Judicial District's (Greene, Lenoir, and Wayne counties) Family Accountability and Recovery Court (FARC) graduation ceremony. We hear from Chief District Court Judge Beth Heath as she explains the concept and function of recovery courts, and hear from stakeholders and staff who support individuals as they work to complete the recovery court process. 

In a special segment, a recovery court graduate gives a moving testimony about her life's journey and how recovery court was truly lifesaving.

"Drug treatment courts have the unique opportunity to create a partnership between the justice system and the treatment community," said Heath. "Drug courts are the single most successful justice intervention for seriously addicted offenders."

May is National Drug Court Month and was recognized in North Carolina by a gubernatorial proclamation and by a proclamation issued by Supreme Court Chief Justice Paul Newby

"North Carolina's treatment courts have been working to restore lives and families for 27 years,” said Chief Justice Newby. "We set aside this month to raise awareness that treatment courts can help break the cycle of addiction and crime and encourage hope and healing through recovery."

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Episode 37 – This episode of All Things Judicial focuses on civics education with a tour of the Moores Creek National Battlefield in Currie, North Carolina. The Battle of Moores Creek Bridge occurred there on February 27, 1776, and was America's first decisive battlefield victory. Historians have concluded that the battle was responsible for ending British rule in North Carolina and provided a morale boost for the patriot cause which ultimately led to the Declaration of Independence later that year. 

Historic Weapons Safety Officer Jason Howell led the tour for Chief Justice Paul Newby where they discussed the events leading up to the battle, the significant events during the battle, and the effects the battle had on North Carolina and the American Revolution. In addition, Newby reflected on the sacrifice of John Grady, the only man to die on the patriot side, and the first North Carolinian to die for the cause of American independence from Great Britain.  

"The cost of freedom is not free and the cost of liberty may be our lives," said Newby. "Grady's vision of freedom, liberty, and self-government caused him, a farmer, to come here and take up arms. Sadly, he gave his life for that cause which would inspire people for the next several years to continue that fight."

A video of the tour which includes a live-fire demonstration of an American Revolution era musket can be found on the NCcourts YouTube channel.

Jason Howell, National Parks Service
Jason Howell with the National Parks Service was the guide for the tour of the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge.

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Episode 36 – April is North Carolina Guardian ad Litem Child Advocate Month and the latest episode of the All Things Judicial podcast focuses on the North Carolina Guardian ad Litem (GAL) program. Their mission is to equip community volunteers to serve abused and neglected children by advocating for their best interests in court. 

This episode is hosted by Ruth Griffin, GAL Recruitment and Retention Specialist Lead, and guests are Reginald O'Rourke, GAL Associate Counsel, and Matt Wunsche, GAL Appellate Counsel. 

"The National Court Appointed Special Advocates recognizes North Carolina's model as one of the best models in the nation because of the triune representation: (GAL) staff, volunteer, and the attorney in court," said O'Rourke on the podcast. "There are many states that have one part of that, but having all three is a wholistic way of making sure that we address every aspect of the child and the family."

To find out more about the North Carolina Guardian ad Litem program and how you can volunteer, please visit www.volunteerforGAL.org.

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Episode 35 - This episode of All Things Judicial features an interview with former Chief Justice Henry Frye. Frye was the first African American associate justice and chief justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. Before that, he served as one of the first African American assistant United States district attorneys and first African American member of the North Carolina General Assembly in the 20th century.

In this 2004 interview conducted by former North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts (NCAOC) Director Judge Tom Ross, Frye shares anecdotes about his early years growing up during segregation and his experience serving in North Carolina's legislature and on the Supreme Court.   

"I thought I brought something to the court and tried to the best I could to look at things objectively but your background has a little something to do with how you look at what happens in the courtroom," said Frye on the podcast. "I think I handled it well and history will say whether I did or did not."

This interview is part of the Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism's historical video series. A video of this interview can be viewed on the NCcourts YouTube Channel.

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Episode 34 – This episode of the All Things Judicial podcast provides an update on the Raise the Age law through a conversation with attorneys and staff from the North Carolina Office of the Juvenile Defender (OJD). This episode's guests include Eric Zogry, State Juvenile Defender, Burcu Hensley, Assistant Juvenile Defender, and LaTobia Avent, Communications Manager.

OJD's mission is to provide services and support to juvenile defense attorneys, elevate and evaluate the system of juvenile delinquency representation, and work with juvenile justice advocates to promote positive change in the juvenile justice system.   

"The main difference between juvenile court and adult criminal court is that we look at these young people as developing adults," said Zogry on the podcast. "It gives us the opportunity to say it's not just how old you are and what you're charged with, it's what else is going on with this youth, what does their prior record look like, and what are some available services that are not available in the criminal justice system."

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Episode 33 – This bonus episode features a tour of  Campbell University School of Law's exhibit entitled First Ladies of the North Carolina Judiciary. The exhibit contains rare photographs and artifacts of North Carolina's first women judges. The tour is conducted by Campbell Law School Dean J. Rich Leonard.

In addition to the audio podcast, a video tour of the exhibit is available on the NCcourts YouTube channel. 

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Episode 32 –  This episode of the All Things Judicial podcast focuses on the Judicial Standards Commission, which serves as an arm of the Supreme Court of North Carolina to give advice regarding the Code of Judicial Conduct, provide training to judges on their ethical duties, and to evaluate and investigate complaints of judicial misconduct. In appropriate cases, the Commission initiates disciplinary proceedings against judges for the purpose of making disciplinary recommendations to the Supreme Court. 

"Judges have to have the attitude that we are here to serve and not to be served," said Judge Chris Dillion on the podcast. "Just because (a judicial complaint) gets dismissed, doesn't necessarily mean it wasn't of some value, because they're all invaluable, because it helps us create better practices for that judge to make sure they are being perceived well by the public."

Guests are Judge Chris Dillon, chair of the Judicial Standards Commission, Carolyn Dubay, executive director of the Commission, and Commission members Allison Mullins and Donald Porter. They discuss the importance of the Commission in preserving public confidence in the integrity, impartiality, and independence of the Judicial Branch, the unique role that judges, lawyers, and citizens play in evaluating questions of judicial conduct, and some of the most common and concerning issues that come to the Commission’s attention. This episode was released in recognition of National Ethics Awareness Month, which is celebrated this year during the month of March.

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Episode 31 – This episode of the All Things Judicial podcast features an interview with Mel Wright, Executive Director of the Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism. The Commission plays an important role in providing continuing legal education to lawyers, and through the Professionalism Support Initiative, acts as an informal voluntary peer intervention program involving professionalism issues. 

On this episode, Mr. Wright shared details about his background, the role and mission of the Commission, and some intriguing stories about professionalism, or lack thereof, in North Carolina's legal community.  

"Legal ethics is the minimum standard required by the North Carolina State Bar, whereas professionalism is the higher standard expected of lawyers and judges," said Wright on the podcast. "Sometimes even judges say and do things that maybe they shouldn't say or do. Often when those type of things happen, I get a phone call."

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Episode 30 – This bonus episode features a tour of  Campbell University School of Law's exhibit entitled First African Americans on the North Carolina  Bench. The tour is conducted by Campbell Law School Dean J. Rich Leonard.

The exhibit features a timeline of the lives and achievements of each judge and justice from 1968-2006. While today North Carolina has numerous African American judges, there were no African Americans on the bench in the Old North State prior the late 1960s.   

In addition to the audio podcast, a video compilation is available on the NCcourts YouTube channel. 

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Episode 29 – This episode of All Things Judicial features an interview with civil rights pioneer Clarence Henderson who on February 2, 1960 helped launch the sit-in protests in Greensboro, North Carolina. Mr. Henderson shares his family background, his battle against racial discrimination in the U.S. Army, and his role in the historic events that unfolded that day which contributed to desegregation in the United States.  

"Walking into F.W. Woolworth's I did not know how I was going to come out, in a vertical position in handcuffs going to jail, or perhaps in a prone position going to the hospital or even the morgue," said Henderson on the podcast. "This changed my total outlook on life. I began to realize that we all have defining moments, but those moments don't define us. It's what we do in those moments that define us."

This interview was conducted by Mel Wright, Executive Director of the Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism, with an introduction by Chief Justice Paul Newby. A video version of this podcast is part of the commission's Historical Video Series.

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Episode 28 – This episode of the All Things Judicial podcast focuses on the Judicial Branch's court reporters, who make verbatim records of court proceedings and prepare transcripts from those records for purposes such as appeals.

Guests are David Jester, Court Reporting Manager, and Susan Burgess, Court Reporting Coordinator. They discuss the importance of their role in the justice system and larger community, the advanced technology they employ, and their personal experiences in the court reporting profession. This episode was released in recognition of National Court Reporting and Captioning Week, which is celebrated this year during the week of February 5–12. 

"Court reporters have an integral role," said Jester. "When I finish a transcript and send it to the Court of Appeals, I know that I am the only one who has a role in the trial court and the appellate process. I know everything that was said and I can communicate it to the Court of Appeals so they can give the case a meaningful review."

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Episode 27 – This episode of All Things Judicial podcast focuses on WORTH Court, a Cumberland County specialized court designed to help human trafficking survivors with supportive care and intervention services. "WORTH" is an acronym given to the court to avoid labeling survivors with the negative stigma of human trafficking. WORTH stands for "We Overcome Recidivism Through Healing" and has been active in Cumberland County for approximately two years. 

"Human Trafficking is everyone’s problem," said Chief District Court Judge Toni S. King, who is a primary proponent of the WORTH Court program. "WORTH Court hopes to be the beacon of light for those victims that thought their voices were silenced or unheard. A new beginning begins with healing."

The episode is hosted by Jennifer Haigwood, Chair of the North Carolina Human Trafficking Commission, and guests are Lindsey Lane, former Cumberland County Assistant District Attorney, and Bengie Hair, coordinator of the Cumberland County WORTH Court program. This episode is being released during National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month and Human Trafficking Awareness Month

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Episode 26 – This episode of the All Things Judicial podcast features highlights from six of the 25 episodes produced during its inaugural season. Highlights include topics from the North Carolina Human Trafficking Commission, Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism, Chief Justice's Task Force on ACEs-Informed Courts, North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission, and interviews regarding the subjects of Black History Month and the Cherokee Sovereign Nation's tribal courts. 

Launched in February 2021, the podcast focuses on the Judicial Branch's role as an equal branch of state government by featuring interviews with recognizable Branch officials and covering the many functions, areas of responsibility, innovations, commissions, task forces, and roles within the Branch. All Things Judicial has received approximately 6,000 downloads from listeners in 33 countries.

Judicial Branch staff and officials would like to thank all podcast listeners for their support, and encourage listeners to contact allthingsjudicial@nccourts.org with any feedback on the podcast and suggestions for topics of interest for future episodes.

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Episode 25 – This episode of All Things Judicial focuses on the State Employees Combined Campaign (SECC) and a selection of charities supported by Judicial Branch employees. Chief Justice Paul Newby kicks-off the podcast with a holiday greeting to Branch employees and is followed by a series of interviews with representatives from the SECC, Second Chance Pet Adoptions, North Carolina Museum of Art, and Families Together. A video version of the interviews can be found on the NCcourts YouTube channel.

"As Chief Justice, the head of the Judicial Branch, I want to say how grateful I am for each one of you and all that you do everyday to fulfill our constitutional mandates that the courts will be open and justice will be administered without favor, denial, or delay," Newby said on the podcast.

Christmas Video Thumbnail

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Episode 24 – This episode of All Things Judicial focuses on the historic budget commitments made by the state legislature to the Judicial Branch in the bi-partisan spending plan passed in November 2021. The recent state budget made the largest investment ever in the Judicial Branch, fully funded eCourts modernization, and allowed the Branch to retain hundreds of employees essential to fulfilling the Branch's constitutional mandate to keep courts open to administer justice.  

This episode is hosted by Legislative Liaison Joseph Kyzer and guests include Chuck Spahos, liaison for the North Carolina Conference of District Attorneys, and North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts Deputy Director Ryan Boyce.

"This budget truly is transformative for the court system," Boyce said on the podcast. "It invests in some once-in-a-generation initiatives, eCourts being the main one, but most importantly it invests in our personnel, our people here in the Judicial Branch."

Kyzer Spahos Boyce

Host

  • Joseph Kyzer, Legislative Liaison, North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts

Guests

  • Chuck Spahos, Legislative Liaison, North Carolina Conference of District Attorneys
  • Ryan Boyce, Deputy Director, North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts

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Episode 23 – This episode of All Things Judicial focuses on the Cherokee Tribal Courts of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians. Chief Judge Monty Beck and Associate Judge Barbara "Sunshine" Parker were interviewed and discussed the structure of Cherokee Tribal Courts, jurisdiction over enrolled and non-enrolled individuals, and the effect that gaming has had on the Cherokee sovereign nation.

In addition, judges Beck and Parker offered themselves as resources for North Carolina attorneys and judges who have questions about the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) and how it applies in state courts.

"We are a sovereign that I hope attorneys and judges are learning about," Judge Parker said during the podcast. "I hope the judges who listen are learning ICWA, are learning that it applies in their courts, and that they are going to need to know how to use it."

Each November, the Judicial Branch recognizes American Indian Heritage Month and celebrates the history and heritage of American Indians in North Carolina.

Cherokee Tribal Court Judges
Cherokee Tribal Court Chief Judge Monty Beck (left) and Cherokee Tribal Court Associate Judge Sunshine Parker 

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Episode 22 – This episode of All Things Judicial features a 2016 interview with the late North Carolina Court of Appeals Judge E. Maurice Braswell. Braswell served as a tail gunner and bombardier in a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress named the "Flaming Arrow" that recorded 41 bombing missions against the Axis Powers during World War II. Judge Braswell recounts several near misses and the harrowing experience of crash landing and being captured as a POW behind enemy lines. Through it all, Braswell shunned the the title of hero and instead embodied a life of service to his country and home state of North Carolina.

"In our generation, there was nothing but a great over-pouring of patriotism and willingness to go to war with Japan and Germany after Pearl Harbor. We felt like we were just doing our duty and being made a hero is still foreign to me in spite of awards," Judge Braswell said on the podcast. "If I could be of service to my state, I was going to do it. If I could be of service to my family and fellow man, I'm happier doing that."

After the war, Judge Braswell served as an assistant district attorney and superior court judge in Cumberland County, and served on the North Carolina Court of Appeals. Braswell died in January 2017 and the new Cumberland County Courthouse was named in his honor. 

Braswell
Edwin Maurice Braswell holding ammunition casings and displaying damage to his B-17, the "Flaming Arrow," incurred during his mission on D-Day, June 6, 1944. (Photo credit: Library of Congress)

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Episode 21 –  This episode of All Things Judicial is a crossover with the Judicial Branch's award-winning Fright Court YouTube series, which questions whether some of North Carolina's courthouses are haunted.

The episode begins by exploring the murder and subsequent alleged hauntings associated with the 1901 death of Elizabeth City resident Nell Cropsey. State Archivist Sarah Koonts walks us through the original Supreme Court of North Carolina case files related to the trial of Cropsey's accused murderer, Jim Wilcox, who is believed to be the only defendant to appear twice before the high court.

In the second segment, a "paranormal investigation team" conducts a "ghost hunt" in the historic Cumberland County courthouse and seeks to answer the question as to whether North Carolina's courthouses are haunted. A video of the investigation is posted on the NCcourts YouTube channel.

AWARDS 

Released on YouTube each Halloween season, the Judicial Branch's Fright Court and Haunted Courthouses of North Carolina series have proven to be the most popular videos on the NCcourts YouTube channel. Designed to draw attention to the Branch in a fun and interesting way, the series is on its twelfth episode and has earned almost 8,500 views. In addition, the North Carolina Association of Government Information Officers awarded the Fright Court video series first place in videography in 2019 and 2020. This is the first crossover episode with the All Things Judicial podcast.

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Episode 20 – This episode of All Things Judicial features Alternative Dispute Resolution, highlights the work of the Dispute Resolution Commission, and focuses on the Administrative Office of the Court's promotion of mediation and arbitration in North Carolina. The episode was released today in celebration of Conflict Resolution Day on October 21, and Dispute Resolution Week which is recognized by the American Bar Association as the third week in October. Guests include Judge Phyllis Gorham, Tara Kozlowski, and Maureen Robinson with an introduction given by Chief Justice Paul Newby.

"Our state constitution guarantees the courts shall be open and justice is to be administered without favor, denial, or delay. Our alternative resolution groups allow us to make these constitutional promises a reality," Chief Justice Newby said on the podcast. "North Carolina has demonstrated a strong commitment to developing programs which promote dispute resolution in our courts."

EPISODE GUESTS

Judge Phyllis Gorham, New Hanover County Senior Resident Superior Court Judge and Chairwoman of the Dispute Resolution Commission

Tara Kozlowski, Executive Director, Dispute Resolution Commission

Maureen Robinson, Administrative Assistant, Dispute Resolution Commission

DRC Podcast
Maureen Robinson (left) and Tara Kozlowski during the recording of the podcast.

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Episode 19 – This episode of All Things Judicial features the final part of a three-part series on the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission (NCIIC). This episode is hosted by Executive Director Lindsey Guice Smith and focuses on the roles and experiences of the Commission's staff. In one riveting segment, staff members give firsthand accounts of their participation in investigations that uncovered post-conviction evidence that led to the exoneration of incarcerated individuals. This episode's guests are Catherine Matoan, Beth Tanner, and Brian Ziegler.

"A large percentage of Commission cases that have resulted in exonerations came after we located evidence that someone else said had been destroyed," Lindsey Guice Smith said on the podcast. "It's really important that we do those searches, ask those questions, and do those follow-ups."

GUESTS

Lindsey Guice Smith, Executive Director

Beth Tanner, Associate Director

Catherine Matoan, Grant Staff Attorney

Brian Ziegler, Staff Attorney

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Episode 18 – This episode of All Things Judicial celebrates Constitution Day (September 17) with a visit to the North Carolina State Archives and a viewing of some of North Carolina's most precious historic documents. Division of Archives and Records Director Sarah Koonts led the tour where she shared original colonial court records. Koonts then opened the State Archive's vault for the inspection of some of North Carolina's national treasures, including an original copy of the U.S. Constitution's Bill of Rights. Later in the episode, Chief Justice Paul Newby detailed an account of the theft of this copy of the Bill of Rights from the North Carolina State Capitol during the American Civil War, and his participation in an FBI sting operation that recovered it in 2003.

"The Bill of Rights is so beautiful and has such a great story about its theft and recovery," said Sarah Koonts. "I always feel special when I look at that document." 

GUESTS

Sarah Koonts, Director of the Division of Archives and Records, is North Carolina's state archivist and deputy secretary at the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. She became North Carolina's State Archivist in 2012. Working with a staff of nearly 70, Koonts is responsible for the statewide archives and records management programs operated by the division.

Chief Justice Paul Newby, the 30th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina, first was elected to the Supreme Court as Associate Justice in 2004 and was elevated to the highest judicial office in North Carolina in the 2020 election. 

In 1985, Chief Justice Newby was appointed as an assistant United States attorney for the Eastern District of North Carolina in Raleigh, where he served for over 19 years. During this time, he played an integral role in conducting the undercover sting operation that recovered North Carolina’s original copy of the Bill of Rights, stolen in the aftermath of the Civil War.

Bill of Rights
North Carolina's copy of the U.S. Bill of Rights
U.S. Constitution
North Carolina's copy of the U.S. Constitution sent to the states to be ratified in 1789
Amendment
North Carolina's copy of the 20th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
Amendment 2
North Carolina's copy of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

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Episode 17 – This episode of All Things Judicial features excerpts from an interview with former Chief Justice Rhoda Billings. The interview was conducted in 2016 by former president of the North Carolina Bar Association, John R. “Buddy” Wester, as part of the Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism's Historical Video Series. During her career, Chief Justice Billings served as a district court judge, associate justice, and the 22nd chief justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. She was the second woman associate justice and second woman to serve as chief justice. In addition, she is the only person to have served as president of the North Carolina Bar Association and chief justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina.

EPISODE INTERVIEWER AND GUESTS

Former Chief Justice Rhoda Billings is a native of Wilkesboro and was the only woman in the class of 1966 at Wake Forest University School of Law, where she graduated first in her class. She practiced law with her husband, Don Billings, from 1966 to 1968, and served as a U.S. Bankruptcy Chapter 13 Trustee from 1966 to 1967. When the district court system was established in North Carolina, Chief Justice Billings was one of five successful candidates and the only woman elected to serve in Forsyth County. She joined the law school faculty at Wake Forest in 1973, serving one year as an assistant professor of law and as an associate professor of law from 1974 to 1979. She attained the rank of professor in 1980.

While on leave from the law school from August 1984 to January 1987, Chief Justice Billings practiced with Billings, Burns and Wells, chaired the North Carolina Parole Commission, and served on the Supreme Court in 1985 to 1986. She also served as a member of the State Judicial Council, an advisory and oversight body for the North Carolina Judicial Branch that helps to study and monitor the operations of the court system and identify areas for improvement.

Chief Justice Billings also served extensively with the North Carolina Bar Association throughout her distinguished career. She became the first woman to serve as its president and is the second woman to receive the Judge John J. Parker Award. 
 

John R. "Buddy" Wester is a litigator at the Charlotte law firm of Robinson Bradshaw.  Mr. Wester has also served as president of the North Carolina Bar Association and as a member of the North Carolina Chief Justice’s Commission on Professionalism.

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Episode 16 – This episode of All Things Judicial features part two of a three-part series on the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission. Part two is hosted by Associate Director Beth Tanner and focuses on the Commission's victim services. This episode's guests are Robin Colbert, Katie Monroe, and Emma Paul. Part three of this series will be released in September and will focus on the work and roles of the Commission staff. "We have really worked hard on making sure we are focusing on the victim's experiences and making sure they have a space to be heard and are informed about the process when they should be," Beth Tanner said on the podcast.

EPISODE HOST AND GUESTS

Beth Tanner, Associate Director, North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission

Robin Colbert, Associate Director, North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault; and Commissioner, North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission

Katie Monroe, Executive Director, Healing Justice

Emma Paul, Victim Services Coordinator, North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission

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Episode 15 – This episode of All Things Judicial focuses on civics education in North Carolina. It begins with interviews with social studies teachers about their experiences with teaching students about our systems of government. Later in the episode, you will hear from Chief Justice Paul Newby and Associate Justice Samuel Ervin IV who led the Supreme Court of North Carolina's civics education outreach in 2019. Listeners will also learn about the Judicial Branch's free civics education materials and Speakers Bureau that are available to educators and others who are interested in making civics education more accessible in North Carolina.

"I hope to inspire students to dig deeper to see that the American experiment is payed forward one generation at a time," Chief Justice Newby said on the podcast. "It will be up to them to look at who we are as a people and make the determination how to shape us." 

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Episode 14 - This episode features part one of a three-part series on the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission. It examines the purpose of the Commission, gives an overview of its structure, and commissioners share why they volunteered for their roles and detail the most interesting cases of their tenures. Parts two and three will be released in August and September and will focus on the Commission's victim advocates and the Commission staff.

"Despite our best efforts, mistakes are made. There has to be a system that can correct these mistakes because if there isn't, everybody loses," Commissioner Boswell said on the podcast. "I wish everyone understood the importance of the Commission and all the factors that come into play."

EPISODE HOST AND GUESTS

  • Lindsey Guice Smith, Executive Director of the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission
  • Johnson Britt, Criminal Defense Lawyer and Commissioner on the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission
  • Rick Glazier, Executive Director of the North Carolina Justice Center and Commissioner on the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission
  • John Boswell, Chief Operating Officer of Zoe Empowers and Commissioner on the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission

 

Episode 13 – July is Juror Appreciation Month in North Carolina and the most recent episode of All Things Judicial focuses on jury service. The host and guests explore the history of jury service, what to expect when asked to serve on a jury, and dispel common myths about jury service. In the second segment of the episode, All Things Judicial conducts interviews with average North Carolinians about their thoughts on jury service.

"Jury service is a vital part of our country," Wake County Clerk of Superior Court Blair Williams said on the podcast. "Jurors play a part in our judicial system and that is what makes us unique in this world."

EPISODE GUESTS

  • Blair Williams, Wake County Clerk of Superior Court
  • Alicia Blanco, Wake County Deputy Clerk
  • Rosie Rijo Gonzalez, Wake County Assistant Clerk
  • DeShield Greene, Court Management Specialist for the North Carolina Judicial Branch

JAM Podcast Guests
(left to right) Charles Keller, Rosie Rijo Gonzalez, Alicia Blanco, Blair Williams


 

Episode 12 – This episode of All Things Judicial focuses on ACEs-informed courts. ACEs refers to adverse childhood experiences of some children who appear in North Carolina courts. In May, the Judicial Branch formed the Chief Justice's Task Force on ACEs-Informed Courts to examine the impact of ACEs on children and develop strategies for addressing adverse childhood experiences within our court system. This episode's guests include NCAOC Director Judge Andrew Heath, District Attorney Ben David, Bolch Judicial Institute Assistant Director of Special Projects Amelia Thorn, and Court Management Specialist Lori Cole.

"We can prevent crime, not just respond to it," District Attorney Ben David said on the podcast. "If we all get on the same page with what it truly means to be trauma informed, to be ACEs informed, we know the path forward and we need to act now."

EPISODE GUESTS

Judge Andrew Heath, Director of the North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts, and Co-Chair of the Chief Justice's Task Force on ACEs-Informed Courts.

Ben David, District Attorney for New Hanover and Pender Counties, and Co-Chair of the Chief Justice's Task Force on ACEs-Informed Courts.

Amelia Thorn, Bolch Judicial Institute Assistant Director of Special Projects, Articles Editor at Judicature, and Member of the Chief Justice's Task Force on ACEs-Informed Courts.

Lori C. Cole, Court Management Specialist for the North Carolina Judicial Branch.

podcast recording
(left to right) Judge Andrew Heath, Lori Cole, Ben David, Amelia Thorn
podcast recording
(left to right) Judge Andrew Heath, Amelia Thorn, Lori Cole (partially blocked), Ben David


 

Episode 11 – This episode of All Things Judicial features excerpts from an interview with former Chief Justice I. Beverly Lake Jr. The interview was conducted in 2006 by former Associate Justice Willis Whichard as part of the Chief Justice's Commission on Professionalism's Historical Video Series. Chief Justice Lake served as a superior court judge, associate justice, and chief justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. In 2002, Lake established the Criminal Justice Study Commission to review factors that may contribute to wrongful convictions in North Carolina. The study commission recommended reforms which led to the creation of the Innocence Inquiry Commission in 2006.

"We have the best criminal justice system in the world, but that doesn't mean we can't make it better," former Chief Justice Lake said in the podcast. "It is incumbent on members of the legal profession to take that leadership role, step into that public service arena, accept that responsibility, and teach and guide and lead our people in the right direction pursuant to the blueprint laid out in our Constitution."

Interviewer and Guest

  • Former Chief Justice I. Beverly Lake Jr. was appointed as a superior court judge in 1985. Lake was appointed as an associate justice on the Supreme Court of North Carolina in 1992, but was defeated for election that same year. He was elected as an associate justice in 1994 and elected as the court's chief justice in 2000. During his tenure as chief justice, Lake established a study commission which led to the creation of the Innocence Inquiry Commission, the first of its kind in United States. Lake served as chief justice until his retirement in 2006 and passed away in 2019.
  • Former Associate Justice Willis Whichard was appointed to the North Carolina Court of Appeals in 1980 where he served until he became an associate justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina in 1986. He retired from the court in 1998 and served as dean of the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law at Campbell University until 2006. After that, Whichard has worked as an attorney in private practice.

 

Episode 10 – In this episode, All Things Judicial takes a deep-dive into the history, story, and controversy surrounding this event. Guests are Chief Justice Paul Newby who shares the origins of our rights and liberties contained in America's founding documents, and Robert Ryals who takes listeners on a tour of Charlotte's Liberty Walk to visit historical locations around the Queen City. In addition, author and attorney Scott Syfret discusses the controversy surrounding the declaration and its impact on North Carolina and the city of Charlotte over the years.

"The 'shot heard round the world' is the fact that our rights don't come from King George. Our rights come from a higher source," Chief Justice Newby said in the podcast. "That's the beauty of our system where we say our rights come from God, our creator, that all are created equal and are endowed by our creator with certain inalienable rights, life, liberty, pursuit of happiness."

Guests

  • Chief Justice Paul Newby is the 30th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. Chief Justice Newby was first elected to the Supreme Court as associate justice in 2004 and was elevated to the highest judicial office in North Carolina in the 2020 election. In addition to his service on the court, he is an adjunct professor at Campbell University School of Law, where he teaches courses on state constitutional law and appellate practice. He is the co-author of The North Carolina State Constitution with History and Commentary (2nd ed. 2013) with Professor John V. Orth of the University of North Carolina School of Law.

Chief Justice Newby
Chief Justice Paul Newby recording for the podcast in studio.

  • Robert Ryals is a docent for the Mecklenburg Historical Association. He specializes in creating and delivering interpretive talks and educational programs for historical venues and organizations throughout metropolitan Charlotte. Tours of the Liberty Walk are available through the the Mecklenburg Historical Association.

Robert Ryals
Robert Ryals and the grave of Thomas Polk

  • Scott Syfert is a corporate attorney in Charlotte and cofounder of the May 20th Society, which is dedicated to commemorating the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. He is the author of the books, The First American Declaration of Independence? and Eminent Charlotteans

Scott Syfert
Attorney and author Scott Syfert

 


 

Episode 9 – This episode focuses on North Carolina's recovery courts which handle chemically dependent adults and juveniles in criminal court. Recovery courts also serve juveniles with abuse, neglect, and dependency cases, veterans, and people with mental health issues who find themselves in court. The program offers individualized treatment plans which include counseling, supervision, drug testing, sanctions, and incentives for meeting recovery goals.

The host for this episode is Yolonda M. Woodhouse, court management specialist for Court Programs. Guests are: (in order of appearance) Janeanne Gonzales, treatment court administrator for the Mecklenburg County Recovery Courts, Special Superior Court Judge J. Stanly Carmical, the original judge for the Robeson County treatment court, and District Court Judge James H. Faison who serves in New Hanover County's recovery courts.

“Recovery courts are a program that truly does save lives. We can help that person regain their lives, and then as a result of that, they are able to reconnect with family,” Judge James Faison said in the podcast. “It really doesn't get any better than that.”

Host: Yolonda Woodhouse, court management specialist for Court Programs

Guests (in order of appearance)

  • Janeanne Gonzales, treatment court administrator for the Mecklenburg County Recovery Courts
  • Special Superior Court Judge J. Stanly Carmical, the original judge for the Robeson County treatment court
  • District Court Judge James H. Faison who serves in New Hanover County's recovery courts

Guests on Episode 7 of ATJ
(Left to Right) Special Superior Court Judge J. Stanly Carmical, District Court Judge James H. Faison, Janeanne Gonzales, and Yolonda Woodhouse

 


 

Episode 8 – In this episode, Chief Justice’s Commission on Professionalism Executive Director Mel Wright discusses and shares excerpts from a 2017 interview with former North Carolina Court of Appeals Chief Judge Gerald Arnold. Judge Arnold shares his experience arguing before the original members of the Court of Appeals, joining that Court as a judge then later as chief judge. Judge Arnold was instrumental in a restoration project in the 1990s that restored and preserved the historical value of the Court of Appeals' courtroom ceiling. In addition to providing insight into the Court's history, Judge Arnold gives time-tested professionalism advice for lawyers.

“There is nothing more important than the concept of professionalism,” Judge Arnold said. “Treat another lawyer the way you want that lawyer to treat you. It's the golden rule and your momma taught you that.”

Host: Chris Mears, North Carolina Judicial Branch Communications Office

Guests:

Former Chief Judge Gerald Arnold (left) and Mel Wright walk the halls of the North Carolina Court of Appeals.
Former Chief Judge Gerald Arnold (left) and Mel Wright walk the halls of the North Carolina Court of Appeals.

 

Ceiling of the courtroom in the North Carolina Court of Appeals
Ceiling of the courtroom in the North Carolina Court of Appeals


 

Episode 7 – In this bonus episode released on the 245th anniversary of the Halifax Resolves, we take listeners on a trip to the Historic District in Halifax, North Carolina, to speak with Frank McMahon, a historic interpreter with the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Frank shares what life was like in 18th/19th century Halifax, North Carolina. Then, Chief Justice Paul Newby joins us in studio for a discussion about the Halifax Resolves and the events leading up to its adoption on April 12, 1776.

“We were the first state to authorize our delegates to vote for independence,” said Chief Justice Newby in the podcast. “As the Halifax Resolves authorized our delegates to vote for freedom, it implicitly said that we are going to form our own constitution.”

Host: Camden Roessler, North Carolina Judicial Branch Communications Office

Guests (in order of appearance):

  • Chris Mears, North Carolina Judicial Branch Communications Office
  • Frank McMahon, Historical Interpreter, North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources
  • Chief Justice Paul Newby, Supreme Court of North Carolina

 

Episode 6 – This episode features the North Carolina Guardian ad Litem (GAL) program which equips community volunteers to serve abused and neglected children by advocating for their best interests in court. This episode's guests are GAL volunteers who share why they decided to volunteer, their experiences in the program, and the joys and challenges of representing children in the court system.

“Children deserve to be protected. Children deserve to be nurtured and to be cared-for,” GAL advocate Julia Lee said in the podcast. “Yes, it can be really, really hard. It can also be really, really sad, but it can be the most rewarding thing you will ever do.”

Host: Bwana Bomani, Recruitment and Retention Specialist with the North Carolina Guardian ad Litem program.

Guests:

  • Ellis Hankins, 5 years of service as a GAL advocate.
  • Julia Lee, 10 years of service as a GAL advocate.
  • Luvenia Williams, 4 years of service as a GAL advocate.
  • Michelle Hillison, 3 years of service as a GAL advocate.

North Carolina Guardian ad Litem volunteer advocates (left to right) Michelle Hillison, Ellis Hankins, Luvenia Williams, and Julia Lee
North Carolina Guardian ad Litem volunteer advocates (left to right) Michelle Hillison, Ellis Hankins, Luvenia Williams, and Julia Lee


 

Episode 5 – This episode celebrates women’s history in the Judicial Branch and is hosted by former North Carolina Court of Appeals Chief Judge Linda McGee. Guests include current Court of Appeals Chief Judge Donna Stroud, Court of Appeals Judge Lucy Inman, and Court of Appeals Judge Valerie Zachary. They discuss their paths to the bench, the people who influenced their lives, and organizations that they found particularly meaningful throughout their careers.

“When I came there I was the only woman on the Court. Our numbers continued to grow and within a few years we had our first all woman panel, and a few years after that, we actually had a majority of women on the Court of Appeals,” former Chief Judge McGee said in the podcast. “It's been great to be able to have one another to be able to talk with, be able to share stories with, and be encouraged by.”

Left to right: Court of Appeals Judge Lucy Inman, former Court of Appeals Chief Judge Linda McGee, current Court of Appeals Chief Judge Donna Stroud, and Court of Appeals Judge Valerie Zachary
Left to right: Court of Appeals Judge Lucy Inman, former Court of Appeals Chief Judge Linda McGee, current Court of Appeals Chief Judge Donna Stroud, and Court of Appeals Judge Valerie Zachary.

Host: former Court of Appeals Chief Judge Linda McGee

Guests:


 

Episode 4 – This episode begins with Supreme Court of North Carolina Clerk of Court Amy Funderburk who shares her impression of the Court’s grand courtroom, and identified historic courtroom artifacts that are hidden in plain sight. In addition, Supreme Court of North Carolina Chief Justice Paul Newby introduces excerpts from remarks given by North Carolina’s newest appellate court judges during their investiture ceremonies held earlier this year.

The Supreme Court investiture excerpts included in this podcast episode are from Chief Justice Newby, Associate Justice Phil Berger Jr., and Associate Justice Tamara Patterson Barringer. They were formally installed at the Supreme Court of North Carolina on January 6, 2021. The audio was taken from the virtual swearing-in ceremony that was streamed online for guests, the media, and the public.

The excerpts for the North Carolina Court of Appeals investiture ceremonies are from Judge Jeffery K. CarpenterJudge April C. WoodJudge Fred GoreJudge Jefferson Griffin, and Judge Darren Jackson. They were formally installed at the North Carolina Court of Appeals on January 14, 2021, and as with the Supreme Court excerpts, the audio was taken from the virtual swearing-in ceremony streamed online. 

Appellate court judges being sworn-in in 2021
Top Row: Chief Justice Paul Newby, Associate Justice Phil Berger Jr., Associate Justice Tamara Barringer, Judge Jeffery Carpenter; Bottom Row: Judge April Wood, Judge Fred Gore, Judge Jefferson Griffin, Judge Darren Jackson.


 

Episode 3Chief Justice’s Commission on Professionalism Executive Director Mel Wright welcomes Kinston attorney James S. “Jimbo” Perry to All Things Judicial. They discuss Jimbo’s career as an attorney and the calculus that many lawyers make between prioritizing work over people and relationships in their lives. Jimbo shared his personal experiences and desires to bring about change in his community through acts of service.

“One of the struggles that we as attorneys have is we sometimes work so hard that we don’t take care of the things that are most important,” Jimbo Perry said during the podcast. “The way to have joy and happiness is not by having and getting but by giving and serving.”

Host: Mel Wright, Executive Director of the Chief Justice’s Commission on Professionalism

Jimbo Perry (left) in a pre-COVID interview with Mel Wright
Jimbo Perry (left) in a pre-COVID interview with Mel Wright

Guest:

  • Jimbo Perry, Kinston Attorney

 


 

Episode 2 – In this episode hosted by Supreme Court of North Carolina Associate Justice Michael Morgan and entitled “Black History Made Me Who I Am,” Justice Morgan welcomed retired Court of Appeals Judge Wanda Bryant and current Court of Appeals Judge Fred Gore. They discussed their journeys from “birth to bench,” mentors who influenced their lives, and advice they would like to share with the next generation of African Americans entering the legal profession. Justice Morgan and Judge Bryant shared their personal experiences of being the first African American children integrated into their local elementary schools. Judge Gore shared his deep commitment to using his judgeship as a positive influence on the youth in his community.

Host: Supreme Court of North Carolina Associate Justice Michael Morgan

Associate Justice Michael Morgan (center) standing with Judge Wanda Bryant and Judge Fred Gore

Associate Justice Michael Morgan (center) standing with Judge Wanda Bryant and Judge Fred Gore

Guests:

 


 

Episode 1 - In its inaugural episode, All Things Judicial highlights the North Carolina Human Trafficking Commission and its mission to prevent human trafficking in North Carolina. Hosted by North Carolina Human Trafficking Commission Executive Director Christine Long, the episode focuses on the role of the Commission and delves into the grim realities of human trafficking in our state, signs to look for, and how to prevent this horrific crime. 

Host: Christine Long, Executive Director, North Carolina Human Trafficking Commission

Christine Long conducting a podcast interview
Christine Long, Executive Director of the North Carolina Human Trafficking Commission

Guests:

 


Trailer - In this trailer for the new podcast All Things Judicial, Chief Justice Paul Newby shares information about the podcast and his vision for the North Carolina Judicial Branch. 

 

Contact

Do you have feedback or episode ideas? Please reach out to AllThingsJudicial@nccourts.org.